Most People Don’t Know What to Do When They Discover Substance Use in Their Family. We Are Here to Help. Start Here

Get One-on-one Help to Address Your Loved Ones or Your Substance Use

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Frequently Asked Questions
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Whether you are a parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, sibling or other caregiver — our Helpline is here for you and anyone else playing a supportive role in the life of a young person struggling with drug or alcohol use.

Our trained and caring specialists are ready to listen, help you find answers and make an action plan to help your loved one.
You can connect in the following ways, with support available in English and Spanish:

  • Text a Message to 614 -956-8392
  • Send an Email bhealthcareclinics@outlook.com
  • Call 1-614-505-3126

Our specialists will listen to your story — the challenges, setbacks, obstacles and difficult emotions that go along with substance use. There is no one-size-fits-all approach and each individual is unique; they’ll propose a personalized course of action, offering the best tools and resources to help you help your child, yourself and your family.

All communications are confidential and services provided free of charge, with the exception of any messaging or data rates accrued via text message.

Text a Message to 614-9568392
Send a text message to 614-9568392

to begin getting personalized help. Our specialists will get back to you within 24-48 hours with a text message response. To allow our specialists to provide the best help possible, please include as many details as possible in your message, such as:

  • Your age
  • The primary drug you’re concerned about
  • Whether or not you have been to or sought treatment
  • Any questions you may have

Send an Email

Complete this contact form to begin getting personalized help over email. Our specialists will get back to you within 24-48 hours with an emailed response. To allow our specialists to provide the best help possible, please include as many details as possible in your message, such as:

  • Your age
  • The primary drug you’re concerned about
  • Whether or not you have been to or sought treatment
  • Any questions you may have

Call 614-505-3126 or Schedule a Callback Time

Speak with one of our specialists to ask questions about the best ways to get help for your son, daughter or another young person in your life.

  • Monday-Friday, 9am – 6 pm ET
  • Saturday & Sunday, 12pm – 5pm ET
  • If a specialist is unavailable or you prefer to make an appointment, please follow the prompts to schedule a callback time

You can also connect with our Helpline Specialists using Facebook Messenger. Simply “Like” our page and click “Send a Message” to get started.

Our Helpline is not a crisis hotline. If you are in need of immediate or emergency services, please call 911 or a 24-hour crisis hotline such as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or the National Domestic Violence hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233).

Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction

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Understanding Opioid Addiction
How MAT Can Help Opioid Addiction
Misunderstandings About MAT

Medication-assisted treatment can help you and/or your loved ones overcome his or her opioid addiction. Learn more about what it is, how it works and if it could work for your family.

Are you or your loved one addicted to opioids?

Opioids include prescription painkillers like OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin as well as the illicit drug heroin and synthetics like Fentanyl, and are a group of drugs known for high risks of dependence and addiction.

Medication-assisted treatment is the use of anti-craving medicine such as naltrexone (Vivitrol), buprenorphine (Suboxone) or methadone — along with comprehensive therapy and support — to help address issues related to opioid dependence, including withdrawal, cravings and relapse prevention. Evidenced-based treatment approaches like this are often needed to successfully overcome addiction and maintain long-term recovery.

“With a strong motivated family, a treatment system that sees to medication and psychiatric care and social supports, there is tremendous hope — no child has to be lost.”

Dr. John Knight, Director of the Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research at Boston Children’s Hospital

Understanding Opioid Addiction

Many teens and young adults first use opioids when they are prescribed them following an injury or routine procedure like the removal of wisdom teeth. Common prescription opioids include Codeine (for example, Tylenol with Codeine), Fentanyl, Hydrocodone (Vicodin or Lorcet), Morphine and Oxycodone (Percocet or OxyContin).

For a variety of reasons — to party and get high, or to cope with stress — some teens and young adults intentionally misuse opioids. The vast majority of those misusing prescription drugs are getting them from the medicine cabinets of friends, family and acquaintances. Some young people start misusing prescription opioids and then switch to heroin as it becomes cheaper or easier to acquire.

Opioid use and misuse can create brain changes that lead to addiction. A person who is addicted develops an overpowering urge, or craving, for the drug. The person also experiences a loss of control, making it more difficult to refuse the drug, even when use becomes harmful. Most people who are addicted to opioids cannot taper off (use less of the drug over time) without help.

“We all think, ‘Why can’t these people just stop?’ and it’s not like that,” explains Dr. Alicia Murray, a psychiatrist specializing in addiction. “They’re not the same person once they become dependent on drugs. They’re a different person. They can’t get to those same skills that they once could get to. Because their brain is now rewired. It’s only thinking about the drug.”